Creating a sense of depth in photography

Creating a sense of depth in photography

Photography is in two dimensions so it is a good idea to add a sense of depth to the scene, this will help the viewer’s explore the photos rather than just glance at them. But how do we do this?

Assure there is foreground, mid ground and background interest, if you can, if not, foreground and background, (use layers). An interesting foreground can make or break an image. Here are various rocks in the foreground, then a hill and finally in the background a volcano.

Use leading lines / Change your viewpoint.  The tracks in this case lead the viewer’s eyes to the houses in the background. And the viewpoint is lower than normal, with diagonal lines.

Frame the foreground/ Shoot in portrait. The arches create a wonderful frame and lead the eye through the arches.

Converging lines, the vertical lines lead to the building and converge with the horizon.

Use a wide angle / Change your viewpoint. When you are using a wide angle lens you can include more in the frame, and getting down slightly closer to the ground you can create a different viewpoint.

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Creating a sense of depth in photography

Creating a sense of depth in photography

Photography is in two dimensions, so it is a good idea to add a sense of depth to the scene, this will help the viewer’s explore the photos rather than just glance at them. But how do we do this?

Assure there is foreground, mid ground and background interest, if you can, if not, foreground and background, (use layers). An interesting foreground can make or break an image. Here are various rocks in the foreground, then a hill and finally in the background a volcano.

Use leading lines / Change your viewpoint.  The tracks in this case lead the viewer’s eyes to the houses in the background. And the viewpoint is lower than normal, with diagonal lines.

Frame the foreground/ Shoot in portrait. The arches create a wonderful frame and lead the eye through the arches.

Converging lines, the vertical lines lead to the building and converge with the horizon.

Use a wide-angle / Change your viewpoint. When you are using a wide-angle lens you can include more in the frame, and getting down slightly closer to the ground you can create a different viewpoint.

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Leading Lines

Leading lines in photography can be a powerful compositional tool. This simple technique helps a photographer bring the viewer’s eye to a focal point, and gives a picture an overall structure in terms of layout.

Basically, any time there is a strong line in a photograph, the spectator’s eye will naturally follow along it. This can be anything from a man-made object like a telephone pole or a road, to a natural object such as a tree or even a dark shadow. You can also pose people so that their posture creates this kind of focal point.

You can use this technique to control the viewer’s experience in a way that creates harmony or symmetry, by using one line to create a peaceful narrative. Or, you can create tension and drama by having intersecting or competing lines that fight for a spectator’s focus. When you master this compositional trick, you have vastly more control over how the emotional content of your photos will be perceived.

You can use them to give a picture a feeling of motion, by creating a visual narrative that leads the eye on a dynamic journey. Some photographers use them as guideposts that actually draw the viewer’s attention across the photo to the edge of the image, and suggests a focal point beyond the picture’s frame.